NEWS & EVENTS

COVID 19 disruption notice 
Due to COVID-19 and current safety measures, the manufacture of MATs will commence at the end of the quarantine. In the meantime, we continue to work from home and are available to discuss your specific MAT needs.  We are currently compiling a waiting list for orders of the first production of  MAT. Since the situation is unpredictable and subject to change, we will be updating accordingly.  We wish everyone to stay healthy and home, protecting yourselves, your family and community. 
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MAT in action treating 19th century canvas depicting Mt. Saint Helen’s before the volcanic eruption of May 1880 by J. E. Stuart

 

Precision mini heat transfer mat and console were used for localized treatment of planar deformation at 30C (86 F) on a late 19th c oil painting on canvas depicting Mt. Saint Helen’s before the volcanic eruption of May 1880;  Oregon Historical Society Museum 75-1.72, Portland, OR, USA. The treatment was carried out by Nina Olsson Art Conservation in Portland, OR. 

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Development of microporous breathable membrane for humidity treatments in collaboration with Polartec 

Moisture and humidification is an essential factor in when treating planar deformation in painting, works of paper or other substrates. However, direct contact between the surface under treatment and water in a liquid phase is to be avoided due to water sensitivity of materials, to avoid excessive swelling of the materials  and risks of unwanted changes, such as staining,  migrations and leaching of extractable soluble compounds in paint or in the substrate. Traditionally, non-breathable hydrophilic  membranes have been used by conservators. Since 2011 Nina Olsson and Tomas Markevicius started testing new types of innovative textiles with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)  microporous membranes that provide for both air and water vapor  transport, but protect from water in a liquid-phase. They proved particularly effective treating planar deformations in paint, paper or textile support when combined with precision mild heat transfer. Most recently, Tomas and Nina began collaboration with Polartec texile scientists and engineers  to develop a microporous membrane tailored specifically for art conservation applications, as a generous contribution by Polartec for the protection of cultural heritage assets worldwide. 

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New methods of precision mild heat transfer in minimally invasive conservation treatments of paintings on canvas at Conserving Canvas Symposium organized by the Getty Foundation and the Yale University, New Haven 13-17 Oct 2019  

 

Paintings conservators Nina Olsson and Tomas Markevicius presented their innovative methodology and research on precision heat transfer at the Getty's Conserving Canvas Symposium at Yale University. During 3 "sandbox" training sessions Nina and Tomas introduced conservators to new approaches and targeted structural treatments of paintings on canvas made possible by accurate temperature management technologies based on flexible mats for precision heat transfer, coupled with other dominant contributing treatment factors, such as moisture content, pressure, and time. During the "sandbox" session conservators could experiment with nanotechnology and mats developed by the IMAT research project as well as with other heat transfer mats, and discuss their application solving their everyday challenges conserving paintings on canvas. The vivid interested exceeded the space limits of the sandbox auditorium, and Tomas and Nina with the consent of symposium organizers arranged an additional meeting with conservators at the hotel lobby, where the discussions continued in the spirit of 1974 Greenwich conference which has inspired the current Yale symposium. Tomas and Nina are working on their publication for the symposium post-prints and given the interest of conservators are planning to develop a masterclass workshop for the mid-carrier conservators in paintings, paper, and other fields, where precision heat transfer is used. 

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New research on innovative application of precision mild heat transfer at the 15th IADA Congress - Warsaw 23/9-27/9 2019

 

At the 15th IADA Congress in Warsaw paper conservator Yuhui Liu presented her research on the application of precision heat transfer and nanotechnology developed by the IMAT project in tear mending of rare books and other applications in paper conservation. The research is based on her MA thesis 'An Innovative Heat Transfer Method for Solving Old Mending Glued with Proteinaceous Adhesives in Manuscripts and Rare Books (Advisor: Prof. Erwin Emmerling, Dr. Irmhild Ceynowa, Dr. Thorsten Allscher, Karin Eckstein, M.A. at the Technical University of Munich. Her thesis is available on the Researchgate here